A group of cheetahs form an orderly line as they walk across a nature reserve, looking for a meal. - Christopher Misztur Photography

A group of cheetahs form an orderly line as they walk across a nature reserve, looking for a meal.

5 February 2018

The hungry cheetahs, a group of brothers known as 'musketeers,' walk in the car trails used by safari jeeps, keeping out of the long grass that grows in Africa's Masai Mara reserve.After three more hours of tracking them, they attempted to hunt a large male impala, but were unsuccessful as night fell.

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The Savannah wilderness along the Tanzania border is also home to packs of lions, zebra, and elephants, but it was highly unusual to see normally solitary cheetahs hunting in a group.

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This group of cheetahs is famous in the Masai Mara, and are known as the five musketeers or fast Five - there were actually five of them, but one was walking in the other tyre track, across the road from the line of four.In that group, three of the cheetahs are brothers and there are two extra boys who joined the pack. By creating alliance they can hunt large species of antelope like the Topi successfully.It would be impossible for single cheetah to bring down a Topi. Maybe this group watched the lions and learned a new behaviour to survive.

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The world's fastest animal, the cheetah can reach speeds of 71 mph to catch its prey. The cheetah is now considered endangered, with an estimated 7,100 left in the wild due to loss of habitat. To see five cheetahs together its amazing, walking in line like this, even more so. They are endangered species and I hope people will appreciate beauty of wildlife and preserve it for future generations to come.

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We have made so many species on the earth extinct, I hope that now is a time to get together and help all animals, enjoy their lives on earth and swap guns for cameras.


Christopher Misztur Photography

           www.cmfoto.com.au


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